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Nutrients and Nutritional Requirements

Nutrients and Nutritional Requirements

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Download this free ebook guide on Nutrients and Nutritional Requirements to learn about the different kinds of nutrients, nutrients facts and the nutritional requirements for your health. Learn about the major changes in the estimated nutritional requirements at different stages of your life. This is an essential nutritional guide for any health conscious person.

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Download this free ebook guide on Nutrients and Nutritional Requirements to learn about the different kinds of nutrients, nutrients facts and the nutritional requirements for your health. Learn about the major changes in the estimated nutritional requirements at different stages of your life. This is an essential nutritional guide for any health conscious person.

Today, nutritionists have a wide knowledge of the role of nutrients in health and disease. We know that people need many different nutrients if they are to maintain health and reduce the risk of diet-related diseases. The amount of each nutrient needed is called the nutritional requirement. These are different for each nutrient and also vary between individuals and life stages, e.g. women of childbearing age need more iron than men.

Each nutrient has a particular series of functions in the body and some nutrients are needed in larger quantities than others. For example, protein is needed in gram (g) quantities. Vitamin C is needed in milligram (mg) quantities (1/1000 gram) and vitamin B12 is needed in microgram (µg) quantities (1/1000000 gram). Individual requirements of each nutrient are related to a person’s age, gender, level of physical activity and state of health. Also, some people absorb or utilise nutrients less efficiently than others and so will have higher than average nutritional requirements, e.g. among older people, vitamin B12 absorption can be relatively poor.

Structure

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The content of the book is listed below:

1 Nutrient requirements
1.1 Key points
1.2 What are nutritional requirements?
1.3 Why do nutritional requirements vary?
1.4 Dietary Reference Values
1.4.1 How are nutritional requirements estimated?
1.4.2 Dietary Reference Values (DRVs)
1.4.3 How should DRVs be used?
1.4.4 Energy requirements
1.5 The UK diet
1.5.1 Does the UK diet provide too much energy?
1.5.2 How do nutrient needs vary?
1.5.3 Life stages
1.5.4 UK recommendations
1.5.5 Are supplements necessary?
1.5.6 Attachments
2 Carbohydrate
2.1 Key points
2.2 Classification of carbohydrates
2.3 Carbohydrate as a nutrient
2.4 Carbohydrates in the diet
2.5 Carbohydrate and dental health
2.6 Carbohydrates and diabetes
2.7 Carbohydrate and cardiovascular disease (CVD)
2.8 Carbohydrate and cancer
2.9 Carbohydrate and obesity
3 Protein
3.1 Key points
3.2 Importance of protein
3.3 Amino acids
3.4 How much protein should we eat?
3.5 Current protein intakes
3.6 The nature of protein in the diet
3.7 Complementary action of proteins (plant protein)
3.8 Animal protein
3.9 Good sources of protein
3.10 Protein and weight management
4 Fat
4.1 Key points
4.2 Structure of fat
4.3 Trans fatty acids
4.4 Essential fatty acids
4.5 Fatty acids in foods
4.6 Fat in the diet
4.7 Translating this into practical guidance
4.8 Fat as a nutrient
4.9 Fat and coronary heart disease (CHD)
4.10 Fat and obesity
5 Dietary fibre
5.1 Key points
5.2 What is dietary fibre?
5.3 Definition
5.4 What difference does the new definition make?
5.5 Sources of fibre
5.6 Fibre and health
5.6.1 Fibre and digestive health
5.6.2 Fibre and heart health
5.6.3 Fibre and diabetes
5.6.4 Fibre and energy balance
5.7 How much fibre do we eat?
5.8 Fibre on the label
6 Vitamins
6.1 Key points
6.2 What are vitamins?
6.3 Requirements and recommended dietary intakes
6.4 Fat soluble vitamins
6.4.1 Vitamin A
6.4.2 Vitamin D
6.4.3 Vitamin E
6.4.4 Vitamin K
6.5 Water soluble vitamins
6.5.1 The B vitamins
6.5.2 Vitamin C (ascorbic acid)
6.5.3 Attachments
7 Minerals and trace elements
7.1 Key points
7.2 What are minerals?
7.3 Requirements and recommended dietary intakes
7.4 The bioavailability and absorption of minerals
7.5 Deficiencies and excess intakes
7.6 Calcium
7.7 Phosphorus
7.8 Magnesium
7.9 Sodium
7.10 Potassium
7.11 Iron
7.12 Trace elements
7.12.1 Zinc
7.12.2 Iodine
7.12.3 Fluoride
7.12.4 Copper
7.12.5 Selenium
7.12.6 Manganese
7.12.7 Chromium
7.12.8 Other trace elements
7.12.9 Attachments
8 Liquids
8.1 Key points
8.2 Water
8.3 Why is water good for us?
8.4 How much water do we need?
8.5 Sources of water in the diet
8.5.1 Caffeine
8.5.2 Alcohol
8.6 Bottled, filtered or tap water?
8.7 Hard and soft water
8.8 Water and sport1 Nutrient requirements
1.1 Key points
1.2 What are nutritional requirements?
1.3 Why do nutritional requirements vary?
1.4 Dietary Reference Values
1.4.1 How are nutritional requirements estimated?
1.4.2 Dietary Reference Values (DRVs)
1.4.3 How should DRVs be used?
1.4.4 Energy requirements
1.5 The UK diet
1.5.1 Does the UK diet provide too much energy?
1.5.2 How do nutrient needs vary?
1.5.3 Life stages
1.5.4 UK recommendations
1.5.5 Are supplements necessary?
1.5.6 Attachments
2 Carbohydrate
2.1 Key points
2.2 Classification of carbohydrates
2.3 Carbohydrate as a nutrient
2.4 Carbohydrates in the diet
2.5 Carbohydrate and dental health
2.6 Carbohydrates and diabetes
2.7 Carbohydrate and cardiovascular disease (CVD)
2.8 Carbohydrate and cancer
2.9 Carbohydrate and obesity
3 Protein
3.1 Key points
3.2 Importance of protein
3.3 Amino acids
3.4 How much protein should we eat?
3.5 Current protein intakes
3.6 The nature of protein in the diet
3.7 Complementary action of proteins (plant protein)
3.8 Animal protein
3.9 Good sources of protein
3.10 Protein and weight management
4 Fat
4.1 Key points
4.2 Structure of fat
4.3 Trans fatty acids
4.4 Essential fatty acids
4.5 Fatty acids in foods
4.6 Fat in the diet
4.7 Translating this into practical guidance
4.8 Fat as a nutrient
4.9 Fat and coronary heart disease (CHD)
4.10 Fat and obesity
5 Dietary fibre
5.1 Key points
5.2 What is dietary fibre?
5.3 Definition
5.4 What difference does the new definition make?
5.5 Sources of fibre
5.6 Fibre and health
5.6.1 Fibre and digestive health
5.6.2 Fibre and heart health
5.6.3 Fibre and diabetes
5.6.4 Fibre and energy balance
5.7 How much fibre do we eat?
5.8 Fibre on the label
6 Vitamins
6.1 Key points
6.2 What are vitamins?
6.3 Requirements and recommended dietary intakes
6.4 Fat soluble vitamins
6.4.1 Vitamin A
6.4.2 Vitamin D
6.4.3 Vitamin E
6.4.4 Vitamin K
6.5 Water soluble vitamins
6.5.1 The B vitamins
6.5.2 Vitamin C (ascorbic acid)
6.5.3 Attachments
7 Minerals and trace elements
7.1 Key points
7.2 What are minerals?
7.3 Requirements and recommended dietary intakes
7.4 The bioavailability and absorption of minerals
7.5 Deficiencies and excess intakes
7.6 Calcium
7.7 Phosphorus
7.8 Magnesium
7.9 Sodium
7.10 Potassium
7.11 Iron
7.12 Trace elements
7.12.1 Zinc
7.12.2 Iodine
7.12.3 Fluoride
7.12.4 Copper
7.12.5 Selenium
7.12.6 Manganese
7.12.7 Chromium
7.12.8 Other trace elements
7.12.9 Attachments
8 Liquids
8.1 Key points
8.2 Water
8.3 Why is water good for us?
8.4 How much water do we need?
8.5 Sources of water in the diet
8.5.1 Caffeine
8.5.2 Alcohol
8.6 Bottled, filtered or tap water?
8.7 Hard and soft water
8.8 Water and sport

Others

Additional Information

File Format PDF File
Format Details In this 70 pages free e-book (compiled by British Nutrition Foundation) learn what are the different kinds of nutrients and what are the nutritional requirements for you and the major changes in the estimated nutritional requirements at different life-stages. The book is in PDF format and content is complemented with tabular data and pictures of food sources associated with various nutrients.
Total Records 70 Pages
Additional Info Image courtesy of [stockimages] / FreeDigitalPhotos.net
Keywords nutrients, nutritional, foods, requirements, download, free, ebook, facts, data, health, nutrient

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